Faculty and Scholarship

College of Law faculty are excellent teachers, scholars, and practitioners. Their influential and well-respected scholarship is placed in some of the most esteemed law publications in the nation.

Scholarship spotlight

Our professors are exceptional teachers, and they’re also highly respected scholars whose interests cover a variety of legal topics.

They are engaged in learning and lead their students by example, regularly publishing articles in prestigious national journals. Our faculty are sought after both nationally and internationally level to provide their perspectives on current legal issues.

Their expertise enriches the classroom experience for University of Tennessee College of Law students.

Bradley Areheart

How should we measure a law’s success? Congress frequently outlines its reasons for enacting legislation. But what if a statute fails to accomplish its articulated purpose but serves another—more important—end? The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) has faced significant criticism since passing in 2008. However, on GINA’s ten-year anniversary, we argue that while GINA has failed to Improve attitudes toward genetic testing, it has achieved unanticipated success as an employee privacy statute. Could it be a blueprint for future employment laws?

The Future of Genetic Privacy, 128 Yale Law Journal 710 (with Jessica Roberts).

Eric Franklin Amarante

Recent trends of philanthropists conducting charity through for-profit vehicles effectively bypasses the restrictions placed upon private foundations. Amarante examines each of the traditional critiques of philanthropy and explores how they are exacerbated when philanthropic efforts are shifted to LLCs. He concludes philanthropy conducted through LLCs is less democratic, more amateuristic, and more paternalistic than philanthropy conducted through private foundations and offers thoughts concerning solutions to the problem.

The Perils of Philanthrocapitalism, 78 Maryland Law Review, 2018.

Bradley Areheart

How should we measure a law’s success? Congress frequently outlines its reasons for enacting legislation. But what if a statute fails to accomplish its articulated purpose but serves another—more important—end? The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) has faced significant criticism since passing in 2008. However, on GINA’s ten-year anniversary, we argue that while GINA has failed to Improve attitudes toward genetic testing, it has achieved unanticipated success as an employee privacy statute. Could it be a blueprint for future employment laws?

The Future of Genetic Privacy, 128 Yale Law Journal 710 (with Jessica Roberts).

Eric Franklin Amarante

Recent trends of philanthropists conducting charity through for-profit vehicles effectively bypasses the restrictions placed upon private foundations. Amarante examines each of the traditional critiques of philanthropy and explores how they are exacerbated when philanthropic efforts are shifted to LLCs. He concludes philanthropy conducted through LLCs is less democratic, more amateuristic, and more paternalistic than philanthropy conducted through private foundations and offers thoughts concerning solutions to the problem.

The Perils of Philanthrocapitalism, 78 Maryland Law Review, 2018.

Meet our faculty

Hear the views of some of our experienced faculty on leadership, scholarship, and what students can expect in the classroom