Faculty and Scholarship

College of Law faculty are excellent teachers, scholars, and practitioners. Their influential and well-respected scholarship is placed in some of the most esteemed law publications in the nation.

Scholarship spotlight

Our professors are exceptional teachers, and they’re also highly respected scholars whose interests cover a variety of legal topics.

They are engaged in learning and lead their students by example, regularly publishing articles in prestigious national journals. Our faculty are sought after both nationally and internationally level to provide their perspectives on current legal issues.

Their expertise enriches the classroom experience for University of Tennessee College of Law students.

Wendy Bach

In 2013, state legislators sitting at the heart of America’s opiate epidemic created the crime of fetal assault. Although they offered a fairly standard series of criminologic rationales to justify the legislation, they also posited that the creation of this crime was a precondition to secure treatment (or care) resources for women addicted to opiates. This article argues that rather than continuing to prosecute poverty and criminalize care, we must reconceptualize the problem far more broadly and turn to programs that heal both families and communities.

Prosecuting Poverty, Criminalizing Care, 60 William & Mary Law Review 809 (2019).

Isaac "Zack" Buck

As it approaches its tenth birthday, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is devolving. Intended to solve problems that had vexed American health care for generations, the ACA built a comprehensive structure by providing more Americans with accessible health insurance, reordering the private insurance market, expanding and reconfiguring Medicaid, and installing rational incentives into America’s health care enterprise. Without question, it was the most important piece of health care legislation since the mid-1960s. However, over its short lifespan, the ACA has faced persistent practical, popular, and policy-based challenges.

Affording Obamacare, 71 Hastings Law Journal__ (forthcoming 2020).

Wendy Bach

In 2013, state legislators sitting at the heart of America’s opiate epidemic created the crime of fetal assault. Although they offered a fairly standard series of criminologic rationales to justify the legislation, they also posited that the creation of this crime was a precondition to secure treatment (or care) resources for women addicted to opiates. This article argues that rather than continuing to prosecute poverty and criminalize care, we must reconceptualize the problem far more broadly and turn to programs that heal both families and communities.

Prosecuting Poverty, Criminalizing Care, 60 William & Mary Law Review 809 (2019).

Isaac "Zack" Buck

As it approaches its tenth birthday, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is devolving. Intended to solve problems that had vexed American health care for generations, the ACA built a comprehensive structure by providing more Americans with accessible health insurance, reordering the private insurance market, expanding and reconfiguring Medicaid, and installing rational incentives into America’s health care enterprise. Without question, it was the most important piece of health care legislation since the mid-1960s. However, over its short lifespan, the ACA has faced persistent practical, popular, and policy-based challenges.

Affording Obamacare, 71 Hastings Law Journal__ (forthcoming 2020).

Meet our faculty

Hear the views of some of our experienced faculty on leadership, scholarship, and what students can expect in the classroom